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Lisa Winika

Artemesia Gentileschi Suffered for Her Art
Artemesia Gentileschi Suffered for Her Art
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Audre Lorde Has an Invitation for You
Audre Lorde Has an Invitation for You
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Caitlyn Jenner Deserves a Medal
Caitlyn Jenner Deserves a Medal
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Cassandra Could have Done Without the Birds
Cassandra Could have Done Without the Birds
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Eve Had a Decision to Make
Eve Had a Decision to Make
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Hagar Didn't Know if She was Coming or Going
Hagar Didn't Know if She was Coming or Going
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Hannah Gadsby Has a Thing or Two to say about Picasso
Hannah Gadsby Has a Thing or Two to say about Picasso
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Lot's Wife Was Ready for a Change
Lot's Wife Was Ready for a Change
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Maria Just Wanted to Save Lives
Maria Just Wanted to Save Lives
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Mary Mallone Had to Make a Living
Mary Mallone Had to Make a Living
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Mashu Didn't Feel Like a Dragon
Mashu Didn't Feel Like a Dragon
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Mata Hari Was a Terrible Spy
Mata Hari Was a Terrible Spy
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Medusa Would Really Like Some Company
Medusa Would Really Like Some Company
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Miss USA Didn't Know What to Say or When to Say It
Miss USA Didn't Know What to Say or When to Say It
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Naisha Hoped She Would be a Good Wife
Naisha Hoped She Would be a Good Wife
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Penelope Wove Her Own Wiles
Penelope Wove Her Own Wiles
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Rapunzal Had Really Waited Long Enough
Rapunzal Had Really Waited Long Enough
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Rosa Parks Was Tired - Racism is Exhausting
Rosa Parks Was Tired - Racism is Exhausting
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Sister Mary Aquinas Had Seen Some Shit
Sister Mary Aquinas Had Seen Some Shit
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The Misunderstood Women Project began in 2018 when I was deeply moved by Dr. Christine Ford’s testimony regarding the sexual assault she experienced at the hands of Brett Kavanaugh, and outraged at the line of cynical and demeaning questioning by some members of  the judiciary committee. I was also shocked to find some men and women close to me had little understanding of why Dr. Ford would choose to remain silent about events from her youth and only years later feel compelled to reveal them publicly. 

 

I began to explore how women are so often misunderstood and to think about how our culture has framed women as willing participants or instigators who deserve the injustices and, in many cases, criminal acts perpetrated upon them.

 

It's clear that advancements for women rest uneasily on unexamined and inherited assumptions. The age-old patterns of subordination are reflected in popular culture, literature, art, politics, law, myth and religion, and pervade every aspect of life.

 

This project seeks to cast a light on some of unexplored ideas about women that deeply influence the foundational thought process and emotional undercurrent of society. Gender prejudice is camouflaged along with the myriad bigotries that go unnoticed in our hearts and minds. By looking at individual women we hopefully see a universal and intersectional portrait. Some are historic and public and true, some are mythological and metaphorical and also true. 

 

This project is not about the systemic oppression of women, though that is obvious and adjacent. It is not about the Me Too Movement, though “Me Too” echoes throughout. 

It is not a men vs. women project. It's about compassion vs. indifference, discernment vs. disunity, empathy vs. apathy, appreciation vs. intolerance, respect vs. chauvinism.

Winika14 _WitchAndShaman.jpg

The Witch and the Shaman on display at 1915 Wine Cellar

Lynne Breitfeller

Lynne Breitfeller is a photographer who lives in New Jersey. She explores the unexpected, or mundane details of the everyday. Human relationships, object relations, humor, and memory and loss are recurrent themes in her work. She received her B.A. in English from William Paterson University and studied at the International Center for Photography (ICP) in New York. After a two-decade career in publishing, she returned to the visual arts.

Her work has been exhibited in juried shows in the US and abroad, as the Griffin Museum of Photography (Massachusetts), Center for Fine Art Photography (Colorado), SE Center for Photography (South Carolina), Marin Museum of Contemporary Art (California), PH 21 Gallery (Hungary), LoosenArt (Italy), Blank Wall Gallery and Chania Photo Festival (Greece). One of her portraits was chosen as a finalist by the jurors of the Lucie Foundation’s Carte Blanche 2022, open call.

After the Fire: Water Damaged Collection

Self Portrait
Self Portrait

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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Sylvia
Sylvia

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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Elisabeth
Elisabeth

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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Priscilla
Priscilla

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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HeadSpin
HeadSpin

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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Mikey
Mikey

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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Julian
Julian

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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Celeste
Celeste

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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Ken
Ken

"After the Fire Water Damaged" collection Photography, Digital Archive Print

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In this collection, Lynne explores photographs as memory, examining the shape-shifting potential of images that have been damaged or lost. "After a fire above my studio, water damage impacted my negatives, chromes, and prints— nearly a third of my archive. Much was discarded, but I retained a collection of negatives and chromes. 

 

During the pandemic, I rediscovered these artifacts and considered the damage that had changed them, morphing them into new images shaped by happenstance. Water on emulsion transformed their compositions that created new meaning.

By sorting through the damaged pieces I was able to come to terms with the loss of my photographic legacy and now see the images anew and transformed. The memory of what was had shifted into something different.  

As with memory itself, does our experience of remembering the past change each time we revisit it? When we think again of it, does it take on new meaning? After the Fire: Water Damaged, made me consider ideas of transience and new incarnations, as I am well aware of the impermanence of possessions, and of memory."

Emerson Woods Collection

Emerson Woods 1
Emerson Woods 1

"Emerson Woods" collection Photography, Digital Print/Metallic Ink

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Emerson Woods 2
Emerson Woods 2

"Emerson Woods" collection Photography, Digital Print/Metallic Ink

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Emerson Woods 3
Emerson Woods 3

"Emerson Woods" collection Photography, Digital Print/Metallic Ink

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Emerson Woods 4
Emerson Woods 4

"Emerson Woods" collection Photography, Digital Print/Metallic Ink

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Emerson Woods 5
Emerson Woods 5

"Emerson Woods" collection Photography, Digital Print/Metallic Ink

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For the past few years, I have been walking in the Emerson Woods Preserve. At first, I would walk for exercise or try to clear my mind from racing thoughts.  Over time, I became attuned to the atmosphere of the woods and realized I was practicing Shinrin-Yoku. Shinrin-Yoku is the Japanese term that translates to Forest Bathing.  It involves spending free time in nature and reconnecting with it with your senses, emotions, and feelings.  It is designed to enhance well-being, health, and spirituality.